• Valley Open
  • Meadowbrook Upper Open
  • Meadowbrook Lower Open
  • Hilleary Open
  • Arbolitos Open
  • Silverset Open
  • Valley verde Open
  • Tierra Bonita/Twin Peaks Open

Recreational Team Parents Meeting

The Parent Meeting

  • Prepare a contact information sheet / roster with the names of all team members and their parents with corresponding emails and phone numbers.  (Be sure to ask for permission to make this information available to everyone)
  • Prepare a parent information sheet and include the following information:
    • Information about you (with your phone numbers), including why you want to coach the team.
    • Information about your assistant coach, if you already have a volunteer. If you don’t have one, ask one of the other parents to volunteer.
    • Discuss your expectations for the team, your focus and objectives. Stress the learning, team building and enjoyment aspects of the game rather than competition and winning.
    • Practice days and field(s) location.
    • Equipment to bring to practices (ball, shin guards, water). Note: Explain to parents who are new to soccer that the socks go over the shin guards.
    • Schedule of games and picture day (if known).
    • Other parental obligations and needs (sponsorships, snacks, etc).
    • Prepare a handout that identifies Team Rules. This is more important with the older children, however it can be useful with Division 6 and 7 teams as well. Here are some examples:
      • Players must notify you if they will miss practices or games.
      • Players are expected to show positive attitudes and to follow directions given by coaches. Coaches will not permit grumbling, horse-play or other disruptive actions during games or practices.
      • All players must be willing to play all positions (particularly at lower Division levels).
      • During games, players are expected to show courtesy to opponents and referees. The decision of the referee is binding, so don’t complain about missed calls.
      • Parents should not coach from the sidelines.  Parents should express only positive remarks to players, coaches and referees. All comments should be general in nature (Good job! or Nice kick!), rather than specific instructions on how to play. Otherwise, the comments may be interpreted as coaching which will result in confusion for the player on the field.
  • Distribute and discuss the PYSL Code of Conduct for parents and coaches.
  •  Identify volunteers on your team who might be willing to help as the need arises. You’re going to need a Team Manager / Rep / Parent. This is a person who is willing to coordinate additional activities with the parents such as snack schedule, team banner, trophies, etc; and someone who is willing to contact parents in case of a practice schedule change.
  • Discuss the kinds of snacks you’d like parents to bring on game days. Usually each family will be assigned a particular day to bring snacks for the entire team. The schedule can be worked out once you have the game schedule available.
  • Stress the need to have at least one other parent at each practice in case of injury or the need to escort a child to the bathroom.
  • Discuss what should be done if a parent doesn’t pick-up their child at the end of practice. In order to protect both players and coaches, parents should make every attempt to be punctual when picking-up their child from practice.
  • Although we all wish for harmony among the players and parents, you need to be willing to take a parent aside and discuss privately his or her behavior. Sometimes you can address parents as a group, particularly if several have been yelling coaching instructions to their children during a game, but occasionally you will have a parent who is just a tad too aggressive or belligerent toward players and/or the referee. PYSL stresses sportsmanship and enjoyment for all players and their families, and the Board is unwilling to compromise those principles. If you need advice or assistance, contact the Board President.
  • Sponsorships. PYSL asks that if possible, teams find one or more sponsors willing to help the league defray some of the administrative costs associated with running such a large program.